Getting What You Want From the Creative Department

Creative people are a different breed, aren’t they? I can say that because I’m one of those creative types, and I can tell you that when my boss says, “I need this to stand out more” or “I want this to really look sleek” he has a very specific idea in his head of what his document/presentation should look like.

artistAnd I don’t have a clue.

I can’t tell you how much easier it would be if he said, “I want the font to be bolder” or “I want it to be blue instead of red.” Those are things I can understand. Sleek? Well, that can be interpreted a variety of ways, and I bet my idea of sleek is different than his is!

If you want sleek and you’re not getting it, here are a couple of tips from me on how you can get fabulous results from your creative department:

Give them time – I’m often asked to write scripts and shoot videos that drive home an operational point to our field staff. When I get these requests, they’re often accompanied by the requisite “I know whatever you do, it’ll be funny/cute/great, and I need it by Friday.” Well, here I have absolutely no specifics to work with, and I have three days to get it done. The creative idea you’re looking for me to provide often does not pop immediately into my head or, if it does, it requires more than three days to execute. The more time I’m given, the better the final product will be.

Set up time to provide feedback often – Presumably, you’ve taken my advice and given your creative person some time. That being the case, set up time to talk with him or her a few days from now to see how the project is going, or to get some preliminary ideas. Maybe even see a few drafts.

Be specific about your feedback (and kind) – I was told once to “get rid of that third-grade font.” Not only did a bristle at the bluntness of the remark, I have no idea what she actually did want. I had to pursue her, and probing led to the discovery that she didn’t like sans-serif fonts, but I wouldn’t have known that if I hadn’t gone marching into her office asking for more. Never mind that I was offended by the idea that I was trying to appeal to third-graders…

If you can help the process by saying, “I’d like to see a fancier/bolder/more delicate font” that’s something a creative person can act on. If you’re thinking of something in a specific color, say so. If you want to create a feeling with the art, articulate that. Or find some examples that are similar to what you’re looking for, and share them with your creative person. That helps, too!

Remember that they know their job better than you do – Creative people are well schooled on what they can and can’t do with company logos, brand messaging, colors, etc., and they know how to work within those parameters. Marketers get angry when they’re asked to do something outside of those brand parameters. Also, they’re good at making things pretty, and if you give them a little latitude, they’re going to come up with something better than you dreamed it could be.

Being a creative person in a corporate world is a lot of pressure. I, for one, am always worried that I’ve had my last good idea and that I’ll never come up with something original again (it hasn’t happened yet, but there’s always tomorrow!). Don’t make their jobs even harder by being unkind in your opinions and vague in your feedback, or it’ll take even longer to get what you want!

Next Post:  Wednesday, February 17

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. More About Working with Those Creative Types | Revolutionary Assistant

Leave a Reply